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The Lord’s Songs in a Strange Land: March 29, 2020

Here are some videos of psalms and hymns for churches and families to consider using in their worship preparations this coming Sunday, March 29. The numbers correspond to the Trinity Psalter Hymnal.

Click t to view the song lyrics, p to view lyrics and music together, and v to play a video recording of the song. The lyrics and music in the recording may not match the Trinity Psalter Hymnal exactly, but they are similar enough that it is possible to sing along.

# Text Tune t p v
22C Amid the thronging worshipers BOVINA t p v
67B O God, show mercy to us THAXTED t v
84C O Lord of hosts, how lovely ST. EDITH (ST. HILDA) t p v
92B It is good to sing your praises ELLESDIE t p v
157 When morning gilds the skies LAUDES DOMINI t p v
343 What wondrous love is this, O my soul, O my soul WONDROUS LOVE t p v

Trinity Psalter Hymnal Recordings

Eenige Gezangen

Today I’ve collected a list of YouTube videos to go along with the portion of the psalm section of the Trinity Psalter Hymnal that is in the public domain or administered by the OPC/URCNA Joint Venture. All in all, there are about 60 videos, between a fifth and a quarter of the total psalm selections in the Trinity Psalter Hymnal. Hopefully this number will grow as time goes on.

Thanks to the gracious permission of our friends at Hymnary.org, I have adapted a table of contents from their online documentation of the songbook, which already includes many psalm and hymn texts and page scans. Now the table links to texts, page scans, and videos when available. You can view the finished product here.

These links can help pastors, musicians, and church members in several ways, particularly during this season of livestreaming services.

  • The page scans make it easy to dive into the Trinity Psalter Hymnal. It is almost effortless to pull them up on a phone, tablet, or computer, as well as to integrate them into a conferencing platform (depending on your church’s livestream setup). Of course, only a portion of the book’s contents are available this way, and you should really buy a complete digital PDF edition of the songbook if you or your church are planning on using it in electronic format long-term.
  • Even when a particular page scan isn’t available because of a copyrighted tune, you can still often read the complete lyrics. This means members can sing along to many selections without needing to have their own copies of the hymnal handy. Of course, it would be ideal if churches could loan their pew editions of the songbook to families until they are able to hold corporate worship services again, but quarantine restrictions in some areas might have already made this a logistical nightmare.
  • Choosing videos to include wasn’t easy, but I searched long and hard for recordings that would be easy to sing along with. Some are a cappella, some with voices and instruments, some with instruments alone. The musical styles vary. For some, the quality is pretty shabby. But I looked for recordings that provided a simple, effective rendition of the psalm setting that will be easy for musical and non-musical members alike to follow.
  • Both during and after this season of uncertainty, pastors and musicians can use the video links to become familiar with the tunes of the Trinity Psalter Hymnal in order to make the most fitting choices for worship services.

Will I be able to add videos for the hymn section next? I’d like to. But no promises.

That’s all for now–please feel free to contact me if you have questions or comments.

–MRK

Resources for Remote Worship

The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has created numerous challenges for churches in many countries where public gatherings are now temporarily forbidden. As church leaders wrestle through questions of live-streaming services, singing is a major question. To my knowledge, no free streaming platform can deliver the synchronization needed for a group of church members to sing digitally together.

So, at this point, many of us are settling for second-best options. One of these is simply for the pastor to lead the singing as part of the livestream, if he has a strong singing voice. Another option is to gather a small slice of the congregation in person to provide the music for the livestream, which other members can follow along with from their own homes. Still another option is to leave singing out of the livestream entirely and to encourage families to sing together in a separate time of household worship before or after the service.

There are plenty of online resources that can assist with some aspects of planning music during this time of upheaval and confusion. For the sake of time, I will only mention two right now; I will gather more resources as I have the opportunity.

  1. The publishers of the Trinity Psalter Hymnal have announced temporary permission for churches that already own the songbook to use any of its music that is under the public domain or copyrighted by the OPC and URCNA in livestreamed services until May 11, 2020. At this point I am not clear on whether this includes digitally reproducing the sheet music for these songs, or merely for streaming a recording of them.
  2. The website Hymnary.org, the most comprehensive index of hymns and hymnals available to my knowledge, includes a vast array of free resources including sheet music and sometimes audio recordings. Page scans of all public domain songs and OPC/URCNA copyrighted songs from the Trinity Psalter Hymnal can be viewed for free on this website. A more limited set of resources is also available for the 1959/1976 CRC Psalter Hymnal (blue).

Worship leaders may also find some of the archives of URC Psalmody useful during this time. In particular, our YouTube channel includes playlists with many recordings of the songs in the blue Psalter Hymnal. (Unfortunately, there is no such resource yet available for the Trinity Psalter Hymnal.) Many of these recordings were created by congregations and choirs and are thus easy to sing along with. Some of the recordings even have lyrics integrated into the video.

The West Sayville URC has asked me to provide a list of songs available online to suggest for family worship tomorrow, and I am including them here in case they are helpful to other churches as well. Depending on how the next days and weeks play out, I may continue to post suggestions for singable family worship music here for future Sundays.

(The numbers are coordinated with the Trinity Psalter Hymnal for those who have personal copies of the songbook.)

148b. Hallelujah, praise Jehovah
Lyrics and music: https://hymnary.org/hymn/TPH2018/148B
Recording with lyrics: https://youtu.be/g4_i-6QPjZ0

415. We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing
Lyrics and music: https://hymnary.org/hymn/TPH2018/page/678
Recording (lyrics for v. 1 only): https://youtu.be/l6gAE_ODosM

476. When peace, like a river, attendeth my way
Lyrics and music: https://hymnary.org/hymn/TPH2018/page/745
Recording (no lyrics): https://youtu.be/_jonnV9j4-c

245. Great is Thy faithfulness, O God my Father
Lyrics and music: https://hymnary.org/hymn/TPH2018/245
Recording (no lyrics): https://youtu.be/zuMIDDNK2b0

I am sure we all look forward to worshiping with one another in flesh and blood as soon as it is safe and feasible to do so. May God get the glory during this time of change and uncertainty.

–MRK

Synod, Kingdom Work, and the Trinity Psalter Hymnal

From heaven O praise the Lord,
On high the Lord O praise!
All angels, praise accord!
Let all his hosts give praise!
Praise him on high,
Sun, moon and star,
Sun, moon and star,
You heavens afar
And cloudy sky!

It took 21 years to move from the beginning of the URCNA’s Psalter Hymnal project to the final publication of the Trinity Psalter Hymnal. Twenty-one years—that’s long enough for a member of the Songbook Committee to bear, raise, and graduate a child.

tph1010As an interested URCNA member who followed the publication process for only eight of those 21 years, I have only a small portion of the sense of accomplishment and celebration that accompanies the new book. But it truly was a foretaste of heaven to be present for this year’s joint meeting of the URCNA Synod and the OPC General Assembly from June 11 to 15 in Wheaton, Illinois, where the opening prayer service began with the singing of Psalm 148A from the Trinity Psalter Hymnal. United Reformed and Orthodox Presbyterian brothers singing a setting from the Reformed Presbyterian tradition of psalmody—it was a moment of full hearts and sincere praise.

Since volunteering as organist at the URCNA’s Synod Nyack in 2012, I’d always hoped for the opportunity to attend another synod. I never expected that the chance would come through representing Geneva College in the display hall. This new role surprised me—just as much as it surprised a number of readers who expected to see me at the organ bench rather than at an exhibitor table. It was wonderful to be reunited with so many familiar faces.

As it turns out, the connection between Geneva College and the work of these Reformed church gatherings is more than coincidental. I’m grateful for the countless conversations with alumni, parents, and prospective students throughout the week that revealed Geneva’s role in providing Biblically faithful education to generations of Reformed believers. This college exemplifies the kind of kingdom work that we heard about in sessions describing the relationship of the URCNA and OPC: an established commitment to Reformed doctrine, a ministry focused on the central role of local churches, and a tangible effort to evangelize and disciple those under its care.

And at the heart of this ministry of education are the psalms—in chapel, in choir, in church services, in dorm rooms. To give just one example, I had to leave synod early to attend a wedding of two friends who graduated from Geneva. Neither of them hails from a Reformed or Presbyterian background. But they sang psalms during their ceremony—psalms they would have never learned to sing at another college. Geneva teaches its students to understand the psalms as songs of the spirit that instruct, convict and edify the saints. Its graduates carry that gift with them, not just into Reformed and Presbyterian churches, but into a wide variety of congregations and denominations. And they share that gift with new generations of believers.

The psalms are not only songs of the spirit; they are also battle cries for the church’s struggle against the devil, the world, and our own sinful flesh. The 21st century witnesses increasing pressures upon the church, including societal changes that require careful statements like the URCNA’s new Affirmations Regarding Marriage. Even within our own walls there are disagreements, divisions and the pervasive presence of sin. The community of saints still suffers the effects of the Fall—and we need the psalms in order to cry out for God’s wisdom and mercy.

So we set ourselves to seek the welfare of Zion, as Psalm 122 teaches us. And we do so with a dual perspective: a local focus that commits us to living faithfully in particular congregations, and a kingdom perspective that lifts us above the landscape to see our gospel mission in grander scale. One of the particular joys of synod is getting a glimpse of that kingdom outlook—an outlook that includes special places like Geneva College and special events like the publication of the Trinity Psalter Hymnal.

That dual perspective is an inspiration and a challenge in my own life. Having graduated from Geneva, I’m now halfway through a master’s degree in communication at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. In the coming months I’ll be deciding whether to pursue an academic career through a Ph.D. or to move on to a seminary track. A kingdom outlook reminds me that ministry can occur in front of chalkboards as well as behind pulpits. A local focus reminds me to pursue the primary vocation of a faithful servant in my day-to-day responsibilities. Meanwhile, I’ve transferred my membership to a local Reformed Presbyterian (RPCNA) congregation—not because I’ve become convinced of a cappella exclusive psalmody but because the nearest URCNA church is four hours away. My faith has already grown through my time among this godly group of saints.

I hope this dual perspective will shape the future of URC Psalmody as well. A few months ago I entertained the notion of shutting down this blog, with its news feed inactive and much of its information out of date. But I was surprised and encouraged to hear from so many of you at synod that the existing content on this site continues to be a blessing. Sincere thanks to each one of you for reading, commenting and participating as we continue to seek God’s glory through the singing of his Word.

Most likely, the updates on URC Psalmody will continue to be sparse. But while there are still psalms to learn and kingdom work to be done, we press on!

In his service,

–MRK

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Announcing “Psalms for the King” Winner!

The results of our first giveaway raffle featuring Psalms for the King are in, and George Van Popta of Hamilton, ON, is the winner! Rev. Van Popta, your CD will be in the mail shortly. Thank you to everyone who participated, and please remember that if you would like a copy of this CD, it is still available online from Crown & Covenant. It is a worthwhile addition to any psalm collection!

–MRK


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