Posts Tagged 'Christ'



Lord’s Day 52: This Is Sure to Be

Catechism and Psalter

Well, we’ve finally reached it: the last installment in URC Psalmody’s Heidelberg Catechism series.  After its opening question, “What is your only comfort in life and death?” we’ve progressed with the Catechism through the Bible’s clear teaching regarding man’s sin and God’s work of salvation, concluding with a large section on the redeemed Christian’s grateful life of service.  Lord’s Day 52 completes the Catechism’s treatment of prayer by considering the sixth request and conclusion of the Lord’s Prayer, finishing with an explanation of that final word: “Amen.”

127 Q.  What does the sixth request mean?

A.  And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil means,

By ourselves we are too weak
to hold our own even for a moment.

And our sworn enemies—
the devil, the world, and our own flesh—
never stop attacking us.

And so, Lord,
uphold us and make us strong
with the strength of your Holy Spirit,
so that we may not go down to defeat
in this spiritual struggle,
but may firmly resist our enemies
until we finally win the complete victory.

128 Q.  What does your conclusion to this prayer mean?

A.  For thine is the kingdom,
and the power,
and the glory, forever means,

We have made all these requests of you
because, as our all-powerful king,
you not only want to,
but are able to give us all that is good;
and because your holy name,
and not we ourselves,
should receive all the praise, forever.

129 Q.  What does that little word “Amen” express?

A.  Amen means,

This is sure to be!

It is even more sure
that God listens to my prayer,
than that I really desire
what I pray for.

Suggested Songs

69, “With Firm Resolve I Held My Peace” (Psalm 39)

“By ourselves we are too weak to hold our own even for a moment.”  As Jesus said to his disciples, “Apart from me you can do nothing” (John 15:5 ESV).  Realizing the frailty of his fleeting life, David cries out in Psalm 39, “Surely all mankind stands as a mere breath!  Surely a man goes about as a shadow!” (vv. 5, 6 ESV).  Apart from God’s provision, not one of us has the strength to sustain his own life for a single minute.  With this understanding, it becomes clear that David’s response to his own feebleness is the only viable answer: “And now, O Lord, for what do I wait? My hope is in you” (v. 7).  The blue Psalter Hymnal includes a beautifully poetic setting of this psalm:

Make me, O Lord, to know my end,
Teach me the measure of my days,
That I may know how frail I am
And turn from pride and sinful ways.

My time is nothing in Thy sight,
Behold, my days are but a span;
Yea, truly, at his best estate,
A breath, a fleeting breath, is man.

Man’s life is passed in vain desire
If troubled years be spent for gain;
He knows not whose his wealth shall be,
And all his toil is but in vain.

And now, O Lord, what wait I for?
I have no hope except in Thee;
Let not ungodly men reproach,
From all transgression set me free.

105, “O God, Be Merciful to Me” (Psalm 57)

“And our sworn enemies—the devil, the world, and our own flesh—never stop attacking us.”  Not only do we face spiritual threats from Satan and the hostile plans of a world that take counsel together “against the LORD and against his Anointed” (Psalm 2:2 ESV), but our own sinful flesh wars against our redeemed natures (cf. Romans 7).  In such straits we can only cry out for God’s help, as David does in Psalm 57:

O God, be merciful to me,
My soul for refuge comes to Thee;
Beneath Thy wings I safe will stay
Until these troubles pass away.
To God Most High shall rise my prayer,
To God who makes my wants His care;
From heaven He will salvation send,
And me from every foe defend.

Great foes and fierce my soul alarm,
Inflamed with rage and strong to harm,
But God, from heaven His dwelling-place,
Will rescue me with truth and grace.
Be Thou, O God, exalted high,
Yea, far above the starry sky,
And let Thy glory be displayed
O’er all the earth Thy hands have made.

26, “Since with My God with Perfect Heart” (Psalm 18)

“And so, Lord, uphold us and make us strong with the strength of your Holy Spirit, so that we may not go down to defeat in this spiritual struggle, but may firmly resist our enemies until we finally win the complete victory.”  Talk about comfort!  No matter how fiercely the battle may rage around us, our ultimate victory is sure, because Christ our Savior has already won it.  Psalm 18 gives exuberant voice to this confidence.  “The LORD dealt with me according to my righteousness,” says David in v. 20.  Although we are no more righteous than David was, we have been granted the righteousness of Chrirst, and the final triumph along with it.  “This God—his way is perfect; the word of the LORD proves true; he is a shield for all those who take refuge in him” (v. 30).

From God the victory I receive;
Most perfect is His holy way;
His Word is tried, they who believe
Will find the Lord their shield and stay.

For who is God, and strong to save,
Beside the Lord, our God of might?
‘Tis He that makes me strong and brave,
The Lord who guides my steps aright.

Thy free salvation is my shield,
My sure defense in every strait;
Thy hand upholds me, lest I yield;
Thy gentleness has made me great.

121, “O God, to Us Show Mercy” (Psalm 67)

(Sung by Cornerstone URC in Hudsonville, MI, and on YouTube)

“We have made all these requests of you because, as our all-powerful king, you not only want to, but are able to give us all that is good…”  In confidence that God will hear and answer our prayers, we eagerly await the day when his saving power will be known among all nations (Psalm 67:2).

O God, let people praise Thee,
Let all the nations sing,
For earth in rich abundance
To us her fruit shall bring.
The Lord our God shall bless us,
Our God shall blessing send,
And all the earth shall fear Him
To its remotest end.

310, “Hallelujah! Hallelujah!” (Psalm 150)

“…and because your holy name, and not we ourselves, should receive all the praise, forever.”  Not only does this beautiful statement capture the essence of the Lord’s Prayer, it also serves as the capstone of the entire Heidelberg Catechism.  “In reckless disobedience” (Lord’s Day 4, Q&A 9) we rebelled against the good commands of God.  Yet in his great mercy, God provided “our Lord Jesus Christ, who was given us to set us completely free and to make us right with God” (Lord’s Day 6, Q&A 18), enabling each of his elect to say, “By faith I am a member of Christ and so I share in his anointing” (Lord’s Day 12, Q&A 32).  While we “confidently await as judge the very One who has already stood trial in [our] place before God” (Lord’s Day 19, Q&A 52), we are comforted and strengthened by the Holy Spirit, who produces in us “wholehearted joy in God through Christ and a delight to do every kind of good as God wants us to” (Lord’s Day 33, Q&A 90).  Indeed, “his divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness” (II Peter 1:3)—and therefore his holy name, and not we ourselves, should receive all the praise forever.

Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Magnify Jehovah’s Name;
Praise the living God, your Maker,
All that breathe, His praise proclaim.

488, “Now Blessed Be Jehovah God” (Psalm 72)

(Sung by Grace URC in Dunnville, ON)

“This is sure to be!”  With that one little word, “Amen,” we express our unshakable confidence in God’s promises to us.  Even when our faith falters and our comfort wanes, it is sure—as sure as we really desire what we pray for—that we belong, body and soul, in life and in death, to our faithful Savior Jesus Christ.  Because we belong to him Christ, by his Spirit, assures us of eternal life and makes us wholeheartedly willing and ready from now on to live for him.  To that one triune God be the glory forever and ever.  Amen!

Now blessed be Jehovah God,
The God of Israel,
Who only doeth wondrous works
In glory that excel;
Who only doeth wondrous works
In glory that excel.

And blessed be His glorious Name
To all eternity;
The whole earth let His glory fill;
Amen! so let it be;
The whole earth let His glory fill;
Amen! so let it be.

–MRK

Lord’s Day 51: Because of Christ’s Blood

Catechism and Psalter

“And forgive us our debts, as we have forgiven our debtors,” reads the second-to-last request of the Lord’s Prayer.  This request forces us to ask: Have we forgiven our debtors?  For that matter, do we truly understand what it means to be forgiven?  And if we are forgiven, why must we still pray for forgiveness?  Lord’s Day 51 of the Heidelberg Catechism, today’s topic on URC Psalmody, offers the outline of an answer.

126 Q. What does the fifth request mean?

A.  And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors means,

Because of Christ’s blood,
do not hold against us, poor sinners that we are,
any of the sins we do
or the evil that constantly clings to us.

Forgive us just as we are fully determined,
as evidence of your grace in us,
to forgive our neighbors.

Suggested Songs

46, “Lord, to Me Thy Ways Make Known” (Psalm 25)

(Sung by West Sayville URC on Long Island, NY)

“Because of Christ’s blood, do not hold against us, poor sinners that we are, any of the sins we do or the evil that constantly clings to us.”  This request reminds us of the words of Lord’s Day 44, that “in this life even the holiest have only a small beginning” of the obedience God’s Word requires.  Although we are weak and helpless, prone to stumble at the slightest obstacle, Question and Answer 126 gives us confidence that because of Christ’s blood, our heavenly Father will not hold our sins against us.  This is the humility and reliance spoken of in Psalm 25, where David acknowledges, “Good and upright is the LORD; therefore he instructs sinners in the way” (v. 8 ESV).  In the blue Psalter Hymnal’s words:

Lord, remember in Thy love
All Thy mercies manifold,
Tender mercies from above,
Changeless from the days of old.

Sins of youth remember not,
Nor my trespasses record;
Let not mercy be forgot,
For Thy goodness’ sake, O Lord.

Just and good the Lord abides,
He His way will sinners show,
He the meek in justice guides,
Making them His way to know.

163, “Lord, Thou Hast Greatly Blessed Our Land” (Psalm 85)

While the Christian’s need for forgiveness is deeply personal, we must not think of God’s redemption as merely an individual matter.  After all, we pray, “Forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors.”  As forgiven sinners we compose a Church—a redeemed people, “a community chosen for eternal life and united in true faith” (Lord’s Day 21, Q&A 54), the very body of Christ.  Thus, as we seek continuing forgiveness for “the evil that constantly clings to us,” we are to do so in the corporate context of the Church as well as individually.  Psalm 85 brings out this distinction in a powerful prayer for God’s forgiveness on his entire people:

Lord, Thou hast greatly blessed our land,
Thou hast brought back our captive band,
Thy pardoning grace has made us free
And covered our iniquity.

O Thou, who in a former day
Didst turn Thy dreadful wrath away,
In grace Thy people, Lord, return,
And let Thy wrath no longer burn.

O will Thine anger never cease,
Forever shall Thy wrath increase?
Revive and quicken us once more,
And Thy salvation’s joy restore.

229, “I Love the Lord, for My Request” (Psalm 116)

(Sung by West Sayville URC on Long Island, NY)

“Forgive us just as we are fully determined, as evidence of your grace in us, to forgive our neighbors.”  In gratitude for the Lord’s deliverance, the author of Psalm 116 declares, “I will walk before the LORD in the land of the living” (v. 9).  If we sincerely desire to walk in God’s ways, we must begin by forgiving our own neighbors.  At the end of the Lord’s Prayer, Christ himself issues this warning: “For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses” (Matt. 6:14,15).  Should anything less be expected of those who have been forgiven so much?

Most kind and righteous is the Lord,
Our God is merciful indeed,
Delighting ever to afford
His help to me in time of need.

Return unto thy rest, my soul,
The Lord has richly dealt with thee,
Delivered thee from death’s control,
From sin and sorrow set thee free.

Since He has freed mine eyes from tears
And kept my feet from evil ways,
Redeemed from life’s distressing fears,
With Him I walk, and Him I praise.

–MRK

Lord’s Day 48: All in All

Catechism and Psalter

We turn to Lord’s Day 48 of the Heidelberg Catechism today, still in the midst of the Catechism’s exposition of the Lord’s Prayer.  Having considered the first request, “Hallowed be thy name,” in the previous question and answer, the Catechism now sets forth what it means when we pray, “Thy kingdom come.”

123 Q.  What does the second request mean?

A.  Thy kingdom come means,

Rule us by your Word and Spirit in such a way
that more and more we submit to you.

Keep your church strong, and add to it.

Destroy the devil’s work;
destroy every force which revolts against you
and every conspiracy against your Word.

Do this until your kingdom is so complete and perfect
that in it you are
all in all.

Suggested Songs

36, “The Ends of All the Earth Shall Hear” (Psalm 22)

(Sung by Cornerstone URC in Hudsonville, MI, and at Synod 2012)

“Rule us by your Word and Spirit in such a way that more and more we submit to you.”  After powerfully describing the Messiah’s suffering, death, and resurrection, Psalm 22 concludes by describing the kingship God and his glorified Son over all the nations.  In praying “Thy kingdom come,” we express our longing for the continued growth and ultimate consummation of Christ’s universal rule.  At the same time, we pray that our individual lives would more and more reflect the image and will of our Savior.  This calls to mind one of the blue Psalter Hymnal’s most beloved selections:

The ends of all the earth shall hear
And turn unto the Lord in fear;
All kindreds of the earth shall own
And worship Him as God alone.

Both rich and poor, both bond and free
Shall worship Him on bended knee,
And children’s children shall proclaim
The glorious honor of His Name.

The Lord’s unfailing righteousness
All generations shall confess,
From age to age shall men be taught
What wondrous works the Lord has wrought.

All earth to Him her homage brings,
The Lord of lords, the King of kings.

166, “Zion, Founded on the Mountains” (Psalm 87)

(Sung by Cornerstone URC in Hudsonville, MI)

“Keep your church strong, and add to it.”  The Church is the New Testament version of Mount Zion, the city of the Lord.  As Psalm 87 says, “On the holy mount stands the city he founded . . . Glorious things of you are spoken, O city of God” (vv. 1, 3).  By “Thy kingdom come,” we pray that God’s Church—the visible manifestation of his kingdom on earth—would be strengthened and increased.  Indeed, Psalm 87 relates how God brings into his kingdom not only Israelites but also foreigners from every corner of the world—even people from nations hostile toward Israel.  What a testimony to his abounding and unconditional grace!

Zion, founded on the mountains,
God, thy Maker, loves thee well;
He has chosen thee, most precious,
He delights in thee to dwell;
God’s own city,
Who can all thy glory tell?

Heathen lands and hostile peoples
Soon shall come the Lord to know;
Nations born again in Zion
Shall the Lord’s salvation show;
God Almighty
Shall on Zion strength bestow.

133, “O God, to Thine Anointed King” (Psalm 72)

“Destroy the devil’s work; destroy every force which revolts against you and every conspiracy against your Word.  Do this until your kingdom is so complete and perfect that in it you are all in all.”  We close our study of this portion of the Lord’s Prayer with an excerpt from another messianic psalm: Psalm 72.  Here the psalmist prays for God’s blessing on the reign of his anointed King, Jesus Christ.  As the Lord destroys every force of evil, crushing the oppressor (v. 4) and making his enemies lick the dust (v. 9), our prayer for the righteous to flourish and lasting peace to abound (v. 7) will come true.  In praying “Thy kingdom come,” then, we are effectively saying this: Come quickly, Lord Jesus!

O God, to Thine anointed King
Give truth and righteousness;
Thy people He will justly judge
And give the poor redress.
Then every fruitful mountainside
Shall yield its rich increase,
And righteousness in all the land
Shall bear the fruit of peace.

The poor man’s cause He will maintain,
The needy He will bless,
And He will break the strength of those
Who would the poor oppress.
So men shall fear Thee while the sun
In daily splendor glows,
And through all ages, while the moon
On earth its light bestows.

Like rain upon the newborn grass,
That falls refreshingly,
Like gentle showers that cheer the earth,
So shall His coming be.
The righteous in His glorious day
Shall flourish and increase;
The earth, until the moon shall fade,
Shall have abundant peace.

–MRK

Lord’s Day 44: Only a Small Beginning

Catechism and Psalter

The Heidelberg Catechism expounds upon the Ten Commandments uniquely by demonstrating how they encompass every area of moral living.  Even the tenth commandment, which we’ll study today, relates to the whole law by stating “that not even the slightest thought or desire contrary to any one of God’s commandments should ever arise in my heart.”  Such an interpretation is devastating because it condemns every one of us.  But Lord’s Day 44 digs deeper than the mere prohibition of this commandment by asking and answering a difficult question: Why do the Ten Commandments still matter if we can’t obey them perfectly?  As always, the answer points to the glory of our gracious God.

113 Q.  What is God’s will for us in the tenth commandment?

A.  That not even the slightest thought or desire
contrary to any one of God’s commandments
should ever arise in my heart.

Rather, with all my heart
I should always hate sin
and take pleasure in whatever is right.

114 Q.  But can those converted to God obey these commandments perfectly?

A.  No.
In this life even the holiest
have only a small beginning of this obedience.

Nevertheless, with all seriousness of purpose,
they do begin to live
according to all, not only some,
of God’s commandments.

115 Q.  No one in this life can obey the Ten Commandments perfectly: why then does God want them preached so pointedly?

A.  First, so that the longer we live
the more we may come to know our sinfulness
and the more eagerly look to Christ
for forgiveness of sins and righteousness.

Second, so that,
while praying to God for the grace of the Holy Spirit,
we may never stop striving
to be renewed more and more after God’s image,
until after this lie we reach our goal:
perfection.

Suggested Songs

237, “How Shall the Young Direct Their Way” (Psalm 119)

(Sung by Grace URC in Dunnville, ON, and by Cornerstone URC in Hudsonville, MI)

“Not even the slightest thought or desire contrary to any one of God’s commandments should ever arise in my heart.”  Like the apostle Paul, we realize that the law condemns us without exception.  “For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh” (Romans 7:18 ESV).  But like Paul, we as Christians also “delight in the law of God” in our inner being (v. 23), and attest that “the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and righteous and good” (Romans 7:12 ESV).  We gladly echo the words of the psalmist in Psalm 119:9-16, as versified in the blue Psalter Hymnal:

O blessed Lord, teach me Thy law,
Thy righteous judgments I declare;
Thy testimonies make me glad,
For they are wealth beyond compare.
Upon Thy precepts and Thy ways
My heart will meditate with awe;
Thy Word shall be my chief delight,
And I will not forget Thy law.

248, “How I Love Thy Law, O Lord” (Psalm 119)

“With all my heart I should always hate sin and take pleasure in whatever is right.”  Psalm 119:97-104 expresses the joy of those who make God’s law their delight:

While my heart Thy Word obeys,
I am kept from evil ways;
From Thy law, with Thee to guide,
I have never turned aside.
Sweeter are Thy words to me
Than all other good can be;
Safe I walk, Thy truth my light,
Hating falsehood, loving right.

152, “Remember Not, O God” (Psalm 79)

(Sung by Trinity URC in St. Catharines, ON, and by Cornerstone URC in Hudsonville, MI)

“In this life even the holiest have only a small beginning of this obedience.”  Let’s be honest: the Catechism’s analysis of the Ten Commandments can be profoundly disturbing.  Can anyone fulfill the expectations of God’s law?  Even as we understand that we are saved by grace, not by works, what kind of obedience does Christ expect of us?

Thankfully, the answer the Catechism provides rests in God, not in us.  The Ten Commandments, it says, are to be preached so pointedly “so that the longer we live the more we may come to know our sinfulness and the more eagerly look to Christ for forgiveness of sins and righteousness.”  And, as the end of Psalm 79 reminds us, God will not remember those sins against us.

Remember not, O God,
The sins of long ago;
In tender mercy visit us,
Distressed and humbled low.

O Lord, our Savior, help,
And glorify Thy Name;
Deliver us from all our sins
And take away our shame.

Then, safe within Thy fold,
We will exalt Thy Name;
Our thankful hearts with songs of joy
Thy goodness will proclaim.

272, “Out of the Depths of Sadness” (Psalm 130)

(Sung by Grace URC in Dunnville, ON)

The Ten Commandments bring us face-to-face with the spiritual battle each of us must fight.  Our sinful natures have been conquered, but they have not yet been annihilated.  The Christian life is a constant struggle against vicious enemies on every side, including our own fallen flesh.  But we serve a gracious Savior who “will redeem Israel from all his iniquities,” as Psalm 130 teaches.  “The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ” (I Cor. 15:56, 57).

Out of the depths of sadness,
O LORD, I cried to Thee;
Thou who canst fill with gladness,
Lend now Thine ear to me.
O Fount of consolation,
Attend unto my cry,
Hear Thou my supplication
And to my help draw nigh.

If Thou shouldst mark transgression,
O Lord, who then could stand?
For evil and oppression
Are found on every hand.
But Thou dost pardon fully
All our iniquity,
That we may serve Thee truly
And fear Thy majesty.

I wait for God to hide me;
My soul, with longing stirred,
Shall hope, whate’er betide me,
In His unfailing word.
My soul waits for Jehovah
With more intense desire
Than watchers for the morning
To dawn of day aspire.

Hope in the Lord, O nation!
For with Him there is grace
And plenteous salvation
For all who seek His face.
He shall redeem His people,
His chosen Israel,
From all their sin and evil,
And all their gloom dispel.

–MRK

Lord’s Day 41: Temples of the Holy Spirit

Catechism and Psalter

Lord’s Day 41, the subject of today’s post in URC Psalmody’s Heidelberg Catechism series, reveals God’s will for the Christian’s life as it relates to the seventh commandment.

108 Q.  What is God’s will for us in the seventh commandment?

A.  God condemns all unchastity.
We should therefore thoroughly detest it
and, married or single,
live decent and chaste lives.

109 Q.  Does God, in this commandment, forbid only such scandalous sins as adultery?

A.  We are temples of the Holy Spirit, body and soul,
and God wants both to be kept clean and holy.
That is why he forbids everything which incites unchastity,
whether it be actions, looks, talk, thoughts, or desires.

Suggested Songs

98, “Fools in Their Heart Have Said” (Psalm 53)

“God condemns all unchastity.”  The apostle James wrote that “whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become accountable for all of it” (James 2:10 ESV).  Indeed, in a broader sense Scripture teaches that we are the bride of Christ (cf. Eph. 5).  Thus, by disobeying him in any way and following the allures of the world, we are spiritually “unchaste.”  The psalmist recognized that this condition of spiritual adultery is the natural tendency of all mankind.  In the blue Psalter Hymnal’s terms:

God looked from heaven above
On all the human race,
To see if any understood,
If any sought His face.

They all are gone aside,
Corruption doth abound;
There is not one that doeth good,
Not even one is found.

Yea, God will put to shame
And make them flee away,
For He will cast them off in wrath
And fill them with dismay.

15, “O Why So Far Removed, O Lord” (Psalm 10)

“We should therefore thoroughly detest it.”  The negative example for the believer to heed and avoid is that of the hardened sinner.  Psalm 10 describes the actions and attitude of the wicked man, who has set himself so firmly against God that his laws are “too high for him to see.”  In a culture where unchastity and promiscuity are becoming less and less scandalous, the Christian’s first step must be to align himself with the eternal truth of God’s law.

O why so far removed, O Lord,
And why so distant be;
Why hidest Thou Thy face from us
In our anxiety?

The wicked in his arrogance
Refuses God to fear,
Nor is it in his thoughts at all
The sovereign God to hear.

His ways are grievous and Thy laws
Too high for him to see;
He therefore his defiance bids,
And taunts his enemy.

82, “A Goodly Theme Is Mine” (Psalm 45)

(Recorded on YouTube)

“We are temples of the Holy Spirit, body and soul, and God wants both to be kept clean and holy.”  The Christian, realizing that both his body and soul are set apart for God’s service, ought joyfully to resist any adulterous defilements of the world, clinging instead to his faithful Savior and Lord.  The battle against sin may not be easy, but our victory in Christ is sure.  Psalm 45 emphasizes the intimacy between Jesus and the people he has bought with his own blood—a story of redemption that is indeed “a goodly theme,” a joyful song.

A goodly theme is mine,
And eagerly I sing;
For bounteous words flow from my lips
As I salute the King.
Supremely fair He is,
In beauty peerless He;
For Him the favor of the Lord
Doth grace eternally.

O royal bride, give heed,
This King is now thy lord;
Forsake thy former loyalties,
Full fealty accord.
Thy beauty and thy grace
Will then delight the King;
And they to thee, since thou art His,
Their precious gifts will bring.

Enthroned in royal state
All glorious thou shalt dwell,
With garments fair, inwrought with gold,
His bride He loveth well.
And they who honor thee
Shall in thy train attend,
And to the palace of the King
Shall joyfully ascend.

Then in thy father’s place,
The sons of royal birth
Thou wilt endow with regal gifts
As princes of the earth.
Thy name shall be proclaimed
Through all succeeding days,
And all the peoples everywhere
Shall give Thee endless praise.

–MRK


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