Posts Tagged 'News'



Time for a Second Edition!

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Timing can be a funny thing. Two weeks ago came the news that the OPC’s General Assembly and the URCNA’s synod had both approved the Trinity Psalter Hymnal for publication—less than two weeks after Reformed Fellowship’s announcement that their stock of blue Psalter Hymnals had run out. At the very least, we can be sure the URCNA won’t be left without a book to sing from!

Of course, this historic decision means much more than that we have a book of our own. Several readers and friends have asked me: “Are you excited?” or “Are you relieved?” A few have even said something along the lines of, “Just think! Your Psalter Hymnal got approved by the synod!” And yes, I am excited—though it’s not my Psalter Hymnal by any stretch of the imagination.

See, that’s just the point: the fact that we’ve adopted the Trinity Psalter Hymnal means that as a federation we’ve been able to move past the substantial differences between “my” ideal songbook and “your” ideal songbook. It proves that by God’s grace, to some limited extent, we can work together—imperfectly, yet sincerely. The new book won’t provide the final answers to what we should sing or how we should sing in worship. It may be an excellent collection, or it may be only a reasonably good one. It may be forgotten in 100 years, or even 50. But it is a step forward.

As demotivational as it may sound, I’ll add this: The time to start preparing for a second edition of the Trinity Psalter Hymnal is now. If the URCNA and OPC have adopted this songbook out of a desire to worship God in greater truth and greater unity, we need to set our minds on long-term investments to improve this unity. I hope the Songbook Committees are already noting what might be done differently in compiling future editions, what recently-composed songs might be worth including someday, or even what other favorite songs from our old books ought to be reconsidered. As individuals and churches, we can take ownership of the new book by immediately noting which songs gain the widest acceptance and which problems need to be addressed most urgently. This could be as involved as an Excel spreadsheet or as simple as a tally mark placed above a psalm or hymn every time it is sung.

All of these are simple examples, but the central purpose is the same: to be thankful for the very good work that’s been done so far, while continuing to propel it forward so that future generations will benefit from the thoughtful investments in worship we are making today.

In short, I’m excited—not because we’ve yet reached the pinnacle of united worship in the URCNA and OPC, but because we’ve set our faces in that direction. And I’m excited for what God will do, as he has done in the past, when his people unite with a humble heart to seek the good of Zion.

–MRK

“Trinity Psalter Hymnal” Editors Appointed

Hymnological MathAs Danny Olinger reports in the latest issue of New Horizons, Rev. Derrick Vander Meulen (URCNA) and Rev. Dr. Alan Strange (OPC) have transitioned from being chairmen of their respective denominations’ Psalter Hymnal committees to the official co-editors of the new proposed “Trinity Psalter Hymnal.” This news serves as a welcome–but still jarring–reminder that the final vote to approve our denominations’ new songbook will occur within the next year (June 2016), and if approved it may be in production in a year and a half!

I’m beyond excited that we have this opportunity to work together as sister churches on such a worthwhile project, and that it is so close to completion. I do have two questions that keep popping up in my mind, though–whether due to my perspective as a URCNA member rather than an OPC member, or just because I’m a (20-year-old) fuddy-duddy. Neither one is earth-shattering. Neither one makes me want to pull the plug on this excellent project. But I still feel the need to raise them here, if only to start a conversation about them.

Okay, the first one is really pretty insignificant. It’s about the proposed title of the new book: Trinity Psalter Hymnal. I have to say, I’m just not won over.

I get it, I get it. Both of our denominations have longstanding relationships with our previous songbooks–the OPC since 1961 (Trinity Hymnal) and the URCNA/CRC since 1934 (Psalter Hymnal). The new compilation contains a significant amount of material from both–so why not combine the names? Also, the word “Trinity” reminds us that when we sing psalms and hymns, we sing them as Trinitarians. The psalms are sung to the Father, about (and by) the Son, through the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. This is good.

At the same time, we have never felt the need to refer to the Book of Psalms in our Bibles as the “Trinity Book of Psalms,” any more than we would refer to Acts as the “Trinity Book of Acts.” It simply goes without saying that the Psalms are Trinitarian. Plus, between the awkward acronym “TPH” and the near-certainty that pastors in both churches will be messing up the title from the pulpit for at least the next five years, I just can’t see a need for this cumbersome appellation. Maybe it’s just my Dutch tendency to want to call it what it is–a Psalter Hymnal. I’m happy to hear explanations and thoughts from my brothers and sisters on the OPC side of the aisle.

My second concern has to do with the comparative sizes of the psalter and hymnal sections. As of the last count, the psalter contains 279 selections and the hymnal contains 428. With almost two hymns per psalm setting, the new songbook has the potential to give the priority to hymn-singing, detracting from the official position (at least in the URCNA) that psalms are to have the principal place in worship.

I’m not as concerned about this trend as I could be. First, I understand that the OPC comes from a rather hymn-biased worship tradition in producing this book, and that the decision to include all 150 psalms is already a significant change for them. I respect the fact that this transition will take time. Second, even many URCNA churches use supplemental hymnals which push our own hymn-to-psalm ratio far past half-and-half. For that matter, many URC’s use the current Trinity Hymnal themselves!

Nevertheless, if this project is ultimately to serve the church of Christ, we need to see a conscious effort made (from the pew-backs or the pulpit) to re-emphasize our biblical and denominational commitment to the preponderance of psalm-singing. Knowing the two godly men who have assumed the responsibility of editing this book, I hope and pray this will become a reality.

–MRK

Take Two on the Hymn Proposal

On May 15, the joint OPC and URCNA Psalter Hymnal Committees released the sheet music for the proposed hymn section of the new songbook online at www.psalterhymnal.org. The collection replaces the first hymn proposal prepared by the URC Psalter Hymnal Committee in 2010.

Added to the approximately 270 psalm settings approved by both denominations last year, the new Hymn Proposal’s 428 selections would yield a songbook significantly larger than the current Psalter Hymnal used in the URCNA, but comparable in size to the OPC’s red Trinity Hymnal.

With titles like “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God,” “Abide with Me,” “Holy, Holy, Holy,” and “It Is Well,” a large portion of the Hymn Proposal will be familiar to the average hymn-singing church member. Several psalm paraphrases from the blue Psalter Hymnal that were omitted from the Psalm Proposal also appear here in the hymn section, including familiar titles like “Christ Shall Have Dominion,” “In Doubt and Temptation,” and “On the Good and Faithful.” Many selections were scanned directly from the pages of the blue Psalter Hymnal and red Trinity Hymnal, appearing with little or no textual or musical alterations.

The Hymn Proposal makes use of more recent collections of church music as well, including five songs from James Montgomery Boice and Paul Jones’ “Hymns for a Modern Reformation” (2000) and a select few songs in a more contemporary style from sources like Keith Getty, Stuart Townend, and Vikki Cook. Current members of both denominations have also contributed to the collection with new hymns like Harry Zekveld’s “Behold, My Servant” and Elisabeth Shafer’s “O Spirit, Fill Our Hearts.”

Consistent with the Reformed tradition in the heritage of the Synod of Dort, the Hymn Proposal includes settings of the New Testament songs of Mary, Zechariah, and Simeon. Other notable selections include a musical version of the Ten Commandments, two versions of the Lord’s Prayer, two hymns based on the Apostles’ Creed, and a musical setting of the first question and answer of the Heidelberg Catechism.

The Psalter Hymnal committees will receive feedback on the contents of the hymn section of the new songbook via email at comments@psalterhymnal.org until December 31, 2015. The finished collection will be presented for approval to the OPC’s General Assembly and the URCNA’s Synod in 2016, Lord willing, with publication to follow.

–MRK

On Psalm Marathons and Similar Endeavors

It’s an exciting time in the history of psalm-singing. In the six years since its release in 2009, the Reformed Presbyterian Church’s Book of Psalms for Worship has become one of the most trusted modern psalters and is gaining use in a wide variety of churches. The Reformed Churches in New Zealand are currently finishing their own carefully compiled psalter-hymnal, Sing to the Lord, which includes the best from a wide variety of psalm-singing traditions. As I mentioned last week, the Canadian Reformed Churches recently completed revisions of the Book of Praise and the English Genevan Psalter. And the United Reformed Churches and the Orthodox Presbyterian Church are hard at work completing our own new Psalter Hymnal.

With a new psalter comes a big learning curve, of course. Realizing this, many churches and individuals are exploring creative methods to become familiar with the contents of these new songbooks.

The Book of Psalms for WorshipThe Reformed Presbyterian Church prepared for the release of The Book of Psalms for Worship by publishing several “Psalter Supplements” containing provisional versions of texts and tunes, in addition to creating an extensive library of recordings, resources, and informational videos. Now, with the psalter in its fifth printing and available in a dazzling array of formats (even smartphone apps), RPCNA members have no excuse not to be well-acquainted with their new songbook.

The Canadian Reformed Churches ensured that each congregation had a chance to interact with the revised Book of Praise by releasing a provisional version to the churches in 2010. Revision committee chairman Rev. George van Popta comments, “In addition to the quality of the work, the near universal positive reception is also due to how involved the churches were in the process” (see “Book of Praise revision completed,” Christian Renewal, 2/4/2015, p. 16).

Another creative venue for learning the contents of the new psalter is an 8-session “Psalm Marathon” coordinated by CanRC organist Frank Ezinga and hosted at two Canadian Reformed churches on several Saturday evenings this spring. With accompaniment on trumpet, violin, piano, organ, and flute, these singing sessions attempt to familiarize participants with all 150 psalm settings from the revised Book of Praise. For more information, visit http://langleycanrc.org/calendar#event/5489.

Hearing about these unique opportunities for learning new psalm settings makes me long to see similar efforts being put forth in the URCNA and OPC. In particular, we need opportunities to learn these new songs not only individually, but corporately. For example, every night some of my Reformed college friends and I get together to sing two or three selections from the Psalm Proposal and give a rough evaluation of each as regards textual accuracy, singability, and tune choice. So far we’re up to Psalm 22, and while our approach isn’t that rigorous or organized, we’re already finding new favorites in the Proposal’s contents. These informal (or formal) opportunities are critical for a smooth transition to the new songbook in just a few years.

How are you currently learning about the new Psalter Hymnal? What ideas might you have for helping your church or a group of your friends begin to explore its contents? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments. Whether it’s a “psalm marathon” or just an informal get-together, I encourage you to actively engage now with the songs future generations will be singing.

–MRK

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Resource: The New Genevan Psalter

The New Genevan Psalter

Fans of the 450-year-old Genevan Psalter had good reason to get excited last year when the Canadian Reformed Churches released a new edition of their Book of Praise with updated settings of all 150 Genevan psalm tunes. For all of this songbook’s great features, however, many of its elements—such as the hymns, doctrinal standards, liturgical forms and prayers, church order, and subscription forms—are only useful in a Canadian Reformed context. Individuals and churches from other denominations or traditions would have little use for this extra material.

Just this week, however, I got word that the Book of Praise’s publishers have released a New Genevan Psalter containing all the updated Genevan psalm texts and tunes without CanRC-specific material! This psalter is intended for use by psalm-singing individuals or congregations from any tradition. For United Reformed congregations, it could serve as a solid Genevan supplement to the current Psalter Hymnal. As its website says, “A congregation that sings the Psalms is rooted in the church of all ages, and a congregation that sings the Psalms set to the Genevan tunes is embedded in the church of the Reformation.”

Rev. George van Popta explains more about the New Genevan Psalter’s purpose in its Preface:

In response to the ever-increasing interest in and appreciation for this precious legacy of John Calvin [the Genevan Psalter], it was thought good to publish a new English Psalter without the specifically Canadian Reformed elements that are included in the Book of Praise. With gratitude to our God we present the New Genevan Psalter to the English-speaking church. May our God be ‘enthroned on the praises of Israel’ (Psalm 22:3) through the use of this book. To him alone be the glory, now, and forever!

For more information, to look inside, or to order, you can visit the New Genevan Psalter’s website: http://newgenevanpsalter.wordpress.com/.

–MRK


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